Types of Pediatric Sedation

Pediatric Sedation

Types of Pediatric Sedation

The Pediatric Sedation Clinic at the American Family Children's Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, offers patients the opportunity to receive medications to alleviate pain and fear before a procedure.

Types of Sedation

Minimal: A mild form of sedation. Medicine is given in a liquid or a gas form. Your child may stay awake but will be more relaxed and less aware of the procedure. Examples of procedures: Foley catheters, IV insertions and injections of various sorts.

Moderate: Medicine is given in liquid or gas, or by IV. Your child may be awake but very relaxed, with little or no pain. Your child may fall asleep but will be easy to wake. The medicine may make your child not remember the procedure after medicine has worn off. This level of sedation is used in wound care, fracture reductions, and some long line insertions.

Deep: Medicine is given in an IV that will make your child fall asleep. The goal is that your child has little to no movement. Your child will not know what is happening during the procedure nor remember the procedure after medicine has worn off. This level of sedation is used in imaging studies that require "immobility" to be satisfactorily completed (MRI scans, CT scans) or painful procedures like spinal taps and biopsies.